Commit 056fc5ee authored by Klaus Stein's avatar Klaus Stein
Browse files

Still rewriting/adding documentation

parent 3d90c558
% Give a short summary of your thesis
\begin{abstract}\noindent
A summary of your work, about half a page of length. An abstract should give
the reader all relevant information about the paper in a nutshell:
Topic, research question, method, results, evaluation of results.
The \cmd{cs-scrreprt} template is based on KOMA-Script
\cmd{scrreprt} and provides the thesis author with some extra
commands (mainly) for title page and declaration, i.\,e. the formal stuff.
This text introduces the template and gives further advise on how to
write and structure a thesis, how use \LaTeX\ to support you in this
project, and which common \LaTeX\ mistakes you should avoid.
\end{abstract}
%%% Local Variables:
%%% mode: latex
%%% TeX-master: "thesisdoc"
%%% End:
\chapter{Code}
\chapter{Additional Stuff}
\label{cha:appendix}
An appendix is the place for any additional information that may
belong to the thesis, e.\,g. details on a questionnaire you did.
\todo
\section{Maybe a section?}
You may structure your appendix like any other chapter, but it is ok to only have a chapter for each appendix.
%%% Local Variables:
%%% mode: latex
%%% TeX-master: "thesisdoc"
%%% End:
\chapter{Conclusions and Future Work} \label{chapter_five}
\chapter{Conclusions and Future Work}
\label{chap:summary}
The fifth and last chapter typically is named {Conclusions and Further Work}. Here you summarize what you have done. State what you have reached and open problems.
\ No newline at end of file
\chapter{Introduction}
\label{chap:intro}
\begin{howtoThesis}
\begin{TODO}
This document needs vast reoganization! It started as an example on
how to use the template and evolved into some kind of manual, so the
structure does not fit well any more.
\end{TODO}
This document is an example on how to use this template. It is
written using the template and you will find lots of comments in the
source code. It explains how to use this template and gives hints
how to organize your thesis.
This document is an example on how to use this template. It is
written using the template and you will find lots of comments in the
source code. It explains how to use this template and gives hints
how to organize your thesis.
In the introduction the reader learns what to expect and how the rest
of the text is organized. It gives the motivation of your work:
\begin{itemize*}
\item What is the topic?
\item Why is this relevant?
\item Why is this exciting?
\item What concrete problem do you want to solve?
\end{itemize*}
Clearly state your research question.
Try to write this as a sketch when you start writing. You will rewrite
this chapter if you are finished with the rest anyway.
The end of the introduction gives an advanced organizer for the rest of the
thesis, i.\,e., a sentence for each chapter.
\end{howtoThesis}
This document is \emph{not} an introduction in \LaTeX\ (we will
refer to some in section~\ref{sec:latexintro}) but gives some hints
......
\chapter{Using \LaTeX~and this Template}
\label{chap:methods}
\begin{howtoThesis}
In the “methods” chapter, you present your own work. This chapter is the
most important one. Give definitions for concepts, present algorithms
in an abstract way and relate your work to concepts introduced in
chapter~\ref{chap:sor}.
\begin{TODO}
Bad title, fix this. We may want to make two chapters out of
this.
\end{howtoThesis}
Add intro paragraph.
\end{TODO}
\section{Semantic Markup}
\label{sec:semantic-markup}
......@@ -43,11 +41,20 @@ text as much as possible.\footnote{sometimes we have to give direct
visual hints, especially in micro-typography.} \LaTeX\ allows us to
define new (semantic) commands for this.
\section{Structuring}
\label{sec:structuring}
\begin{TODO}
Use this! Work with it actively!
\end{TODO}
\begin{howtoThesis}
\section{Thesis Composition}
\label{sec:thesis-composition}
\todo
\subsection{Chapter Structure}
\label{sec:structure}
The chapters Introduction and Conclusions should have no sections.
For the other chapters, each sectioning (chapter, section, subsection,
\dots) should have either \emph{none} or \emph{at least two} sub
......@@ -57,8 +64,110 @@ Every chapter, section etc starts with some introducing paragraph
telling the reader what to expect here. This is, between the chapter
heading and the section heading there should be at least one sentence.
In general, your thesis roughly should be structured the following
way.
\subsubsection{Titlepage}
\label{sec:struct-title}
The title page holds all the formal stuff, just follow the
template. There are some requirements from the university,
\Note{do we have a link?}
\Note{On an English thesis: does the German title have to be
\emph{somewhere}?}
make sure to fulfil them. Please note that the title itself has to be
the same as given in the application and changing it later is extra
formal work (we want to avoid this).
\subsubsection{Abstract}
\label{sec:struct-abstract}
\Note{Do we want an abstract in English \emph{and} German?}
A summary of your work, less than half a page of length. An
abstract should give the reader all relevant information about the
paper in a nutshell: Topic, research question, method, results,
evaluation of results. This is what one reads to figure out if the
paper (thesis) should be read.
\subsubsection{Introduction}
\label{sec:struct-intro}
In the introduction the reader learns what to expect and how the rest
of the text is organized. It gives the motivation of your work:
\begin{itemize*}
\item What is the topic?
\item Why is this relevant?
\item Why is this exciting?
\item What concrete problem do you want to solve?
\end{itemize*}
Clearly state your research question.
Try to write this as a sketch when you start writing. You will rewrite
this chapter if you are finished with the rest anyway.
The end of the introduction gives an advanced organizer for the rest of the
thesis, i.\,e., a sentence for each chapter. Something like:
“Chapter~\ref{chap:sor} gives an overview on the state of the research
on logomachy and rabulistics. In Chapter~\ref{chap:methods}
I\footnote{This is your thesis, so it should be “I” and not “we”. If
you did something together with someone else (e.\,g. your advisor)
clearly state what \emph{your} part of the work is.}
\Note{I like it if authors tell me that \emph{they} developed something
instead of sticking to passive sentence constructions. I hope this
is ok.}
introduce the Aballa-model and the SuperCaliFragiListicExpialidocious
algorithm that …”
\subsubsection{State of the Research}
\label{sec:struct-sor}
In this chapter you introduce all necessary theoretical and empirical
findings, formalisms or algorithms on which your own work is
based. Name the chapter such that the scope is clearly characterized,
e.\,g., \emph{Generalizing Patterns in Rabulistic Approaches to
Logomachy}. Show that you know the relevant papers of your
field. Use a section for each aspect you are covering.
\subsubsection{Methods}
\label{sec:struct-methods}
In the “methods” chapter, you present your own work. This chapter is the
most important one. Give definitions for concepts, present algorithms
in an abstract way and relate your work to concepts introduced in
the state of research chapter. Give this chapter an appropriate
name.
\subsubsection{Realisation and Evaluation}
\label{sec:struct-eval}
This chapter is typically named \emph{Realisation and
Evaluation}. Here you give the most important technical details
(more details are given in the appendix). Then you evaluate your
approach -- typically by test runs. Describe the data used for the
tests carefully. Give meaningful graphs. This chapter together
with the appendix should give all information which is necessary that
somebody else can do the same test runs as you did.
\subsubsection{Conclusions and Future Work}
\label{sec:struct-summary}
Here you summarize what you have done. State what you have reached and
open problems.
\subsubsection{Appendix}
\label{sec:struct-appendix}
An appendix is the place for any additional information that may
belong to the thesis, e.\,g. details on your program code or a
questionnaire you did. Name your appendix chapters accordingly.
You may structure your appendix like any other chapter, but it is ok
to only have a chapter for each appendix.
\end{howtoThesis}
\subsection{\LaTeX\ Headings}
\label{sec:latex-headings}
You should always use the appropriate \LaTeX\ commands for the
headings (like \verb|\chapter{…}|, \verb|\section{…}|,
\verb|\subsection{…}|, …). If you feel the need to derive from the
......@@ -93,7 +202,7 @@ page headings.
You use \verb|\label{sec:foo}| to assign tags to your sections and
\verb|\ref{sec:foo}| and \verb|\pageref{sec:foo}| to refer to the
tagged section by number and page number (e.\,g. see
section~\ref{sec:structuring} on page~\pageref{sec:structuring}). A~good
section~\ref{sec:structure} on page~\pageref{sec:structure}). A~good
\LaTeX-editor will automatically provide you with labels for your
sections.
......@@ -254,8 +363,8 @@ provides you with everyting you need.
\label{sec:typography}
\begin{itemize}\Note{This will become several subsections}
\item widows und orphans
\item „“ “
\item Microtypography (spacings etc)
\item“ “…” ``…'' {\selectlanguage{ngerman}"`…"'}
\item Microtypography (spacings etc) (e.\,g., a~good thing, …)
\item hyphenation
\item don't mess around
\item matching fonts
......
\chapter{\LaTeX\ and Scientific Articles)}
\chapter{\LaTeX}
\label{chap:sor}
\begin{howtoThesis}
In this chapter you introduce all necessary theoretical and empirical
findings, formalisms or algorithms on which your own work is
based. Name the chapter such that the scope is clearly characterized,
e.g., \emph{ Generalizing Patterns with Grammar Inference Methods}. Use
a section for each aspect you are covering.
As the document you are currently reading is a manual and \emph{not} a
thesis or scientific paper this chapter gives you proposals on what to
read but does not fully discuss the state of the art covering
everything.
If you have other helpful sources please file an issue or a pull
request to the
request to the\Note{Do we have a function email address we can give
here?
}
\fhref{https://gitlab.rz.uni-bamberg.de/cogsys/public/students/thesis-template}{repo}.
\end{howtoThesis}
......
\newenvironment{TODO}{%
\begin{quote}
\color{red!80!black}
\mbox{}\marginline{TODO}%
\color{red!80!black}%
\mbox{}\marginline{\sffamily\bfseries TODO}\ignorespaces
}{%
\end{quote}
}
\newcommand{\todo}[1][\rule{2em}{2ex}]{
\begin{TODO}
#1
\end{TODO}}
\newcommand{\Note}[1]{\marginline{%
\tikz\node[fill=yellow,draw=yellow!60!red,thick,
node font=\footnotesize\sffamily,text width=\linewidth-2em,
minimum size=2em,inner sep=1em]{#1};}}
\tikz[baseline=(note.base)]
\node[fill=yellow,draw=yellow!75!red,thick,
node font=\footnotesize\sffamily,text width=\linewidth-2ex,
align=left, text=red!25!black,
minimum size=2em,inner sep=1ex] (note){#1};}}
......@@ -148,15 +148,15 @@
\listoftables
\listoffigures
% 1. Chapter: ''Introduction''
% 1. Chapter: ``Introduction''
\input{chapter-intro.tex}
% 2. Chapter: ''State of Research''
% 2. Chapter: ``State of Research''
\input{chapter-sor.tex}
% 3. Chapter: ''Methods''
% 3. Chapter: ``Methods''
\input{chapter-methods.tex}
% 4. Chapter: ''Realisation and Evaluation''
% 4. Chapter: ``Realisation and Evaluation''
\input{chapter-eval.tex}
% 5. Chapter: ''Conclusions and Future Work''
% 5. Chapter: ``Conclusions and Future Work''
\input{chapter-close.tex}
......
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